The names of these works are speculative and have not been officially recognized.

This is a list of songs and poems found throughout Kill Six Billion Demons.

The King on the Throne

The king on the throne, alone one day,
Took all the words in his mouth and threw them away,
First came the servants, the first of the seen,
Who built him a house, and kept his hearth clean
Next came the tall men of stone and cold fire,
To seek out all sinners and add to the pyre.
Then came the beloved, the storied and told,
The first to lay claim to the cosmos of old.
Last came the white men of bones, teeth, and eyes,
Who swallow all truths and spit out only lies.[1]

The Orders Four

What makes a knight?
A shining blade or bloody battered steel?
Let us name the Orders Four and the truth within reveal.
The Geas Knight unknown by name, the seeker proud and true,
His endless quest hath rent the stars yet known is he by few,
The Peregrine, whose bell always rings the crack of breaking day,
Its nameless peal will drive the ceaseless evil from the ways,
The Bloody Knight, belligerent, her edge tastes skulls and lives,
The viscera of common men and royalty besides,
The Mendicant, the beggar knight, roughly clad and shod,
He lives as though he were a beast, but fights he as a God.[2]

Bard's rhyme

Our lady's quite a portly one,
But rarely does she eat.
She cracks apart the bones of God,
And sucks off all the meat.[3]

Bring me a Bottle

Bring me a bottle or two, me lad,
Bring me a bottle or four,
For the company of fine o’ women and wine-
-Is what I'm looking for.
Bring me my big ole' knife me lad,
Bring me my rusty ole' gun,
For the wine and women ain't comin' for free-
And there's plenty of work to be done.[4]
There's plenty of folks here-abouts, me lad,
Whose bellies and purses are fat,
They drive company cars, smoke expensive cigars,
And have men to take care of their hat
They don't give a care for us poor hatless fools,
Though out in the gutter we sit-
But the thing 'bout full bellies and purses, me lad,
Is both are easy to slit[5]
Bring me a bottle or two, me lad,
Bring me a bottle or four...[6]
-Shake the dust off my cloak,
Be me my best smokes,
An' leave all your regrets at the door.
So make sure your ole' knife is sharp, me lad,
An' make sure your powder is dry,
For the world is awash with fools, blood, and gold,
And all men are just waitin' to die.[7]